Women’s History Month

As Women’s History Month ends, we want to remind you of the importance of celebrating this holiday and if you didn’t celebrate this year, see if we can give you some inspiration to rally your girl gang for a special night soon! This year’s celebration is “Women Who Advocate for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion.”


Facts:

  • Women’s History Month began as a local celebration in Santa Rosa, California. The Education Task Force of the Sonoma County (California) Commission on the Status of Women planned and executed a “Women’s History Week” celebration in 1978. The organizers selected the week of March 8 to correspond with International Women’s Day. The movement spread across the country as other communities initiated their own Women’s History Week celebrations the following year.
  • In 1980, a consortium of women’s groups and historians—led by the National Women’s History Project (now the National Women’s History Alliance)—successfully lobbied for national recognition. In February 1980, President Jimmy Carter issued the first Presidential Proclamation declaring the Week of March 8th, 1980 as National Women’s History Week. 
  • Subsequent Presidents continued to proclaim a National Women’s History Week in March until 1987 when Congress passed Public Law 100-9, designating March as “Women’s History Month.” Between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the President to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month. Since 1995, each president has issued an annual proclamation designating the month of March as “Women’s History Month.”
  • The National Women’s History Alliance selects and publishes the yearly theme. The Women’s History Month theme in 2021 captures the spirit of these challenging times. Since many of the women’s suffrage centennial celebrations originally scheduled for 2020 were curtailed, the National Women’s History Alliance is extending the annual theme for 2021 to “Valiant Women of the Vote: Refusing to Be Silenced. The National Women’s History Month’s theme for 2024 celebrates “Women Who Advocate for Equity, Diversity and Inclusion.”  
  • Among the notable figures often spotlighted during Women’s History Month are Sacagawea, a Native American woman who helped make Lewis and Clark’s expedition to map parts of the West in the early 19th century a success; Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, who fought for equality for women in the mid-19th century, more than 70 years before the 19th Amendment gave women the right to vote in the United States in 1920; Harriet Tubman, a spy who led slaves to freedom during the Civil War; Amelia Earhart, one of the world’s first female pilots (she mysteriously disappeared over the Pacific Ocean in 1937); Madeleine Albright, who became the first female Secretary of State in 1996; and Misty Copeland, the first African-American woman to be named a principal dancer—the highest level—in the 75-year history of the American Ballet Theatre in 2015.
  • Since the first Women’s History Week in 1978, other countries have joined the United States in honoring women and their contribution to history and culture, including Canada and Australia.
  • Each year the National Women’s History Alliance chooses a theme for Women’s History Month. Previous themes have included “Women Taking the Lead to Save Our Planet“(2009) and “Celebrating Women in STEM” (2013). The theme for 2020 and 2021 is “Valiant Women of the Vote.” (Learn about the fight for the right to vote.) And the theme for 2023 is “Celebrating Women Who Tell Our Stories.” 
  • Beyond the year’s theme, Women’s History Month continues the discussion of women and their contributions through activities such as museum exhibits and film screenings, and by encouraging the study of achievements by women year-round.

How to observe:

  • Learn about important women who helped make life for women in the United States possible and share with family and friends the information you learn. 
  • See if your local community has events to celebrate the achievements of women in history and generations to come.

Videos


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I’m excited to share that this month is #WomensHistoryMonth and between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the President to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month. Since 1995, each president has issued an annual proclamation designating the month of March as “Women’s History Month.” See how you can learn more about the importance of sharing about this holiday! @SpOlympicsMD

Today I learned that in between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the President to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month. Since 1995, each president has issued an annual proclamation designating the month of March as “Women’s History Month.” Learn more about the importance of #WomensHistoryMonth and share about the incredible history today! @SpOlympicsMD

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